What Brain-Computer Interfaces Could Mean for the Future of Work – Harvard Business Review

What Brain-Computer Interfaces Could Mean for the Future of Work – Harvard Business Review

Executive Summary

Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) are slowly moving into the mass market. In the next few years, we might be able to control our PowerPoint presentation or Excel files using only our brains. And companies may want to use BCI technology to monitor the attention levels and mental states of their employees. Obviously, there are myriad ethical questions and concerns surrounding the use of BCI technology in the workplace. The technology is well ahead of the policies and regulations that would need to be put in place. But, it’s time for business leaders to start building a BCI strategy as soon as possible to address the potential risks and benefits.

HBR Staff/Keitravis Squire/Unsplash

Imagine if your manager could know whether you actually paid attention in your last Zoom meeting. Or, imagine if you could prepare your next presentation using only your thoughts. These scenarios might soon become a reality thanks to the development of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs).

To put it in the simplest terms, think of a BCI as a bridge between your brain and an external device. As of today, we mostly rely on electroencephalography (EEG) — a collection of methods for monitoring the electrical activity of the brain — to do this. But, that’s changing. By leveraging multiple sensors and complex algorithms, it’s now
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